Reminder: The Fall Social Mixer is Tonight

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Google Map Directions

Parking Instructions

If you use “3701 San Martin Dr. “ address, your GPS may tell you “ You have arrived at your destination” in the middle of the street in front of three trees (Figure 1).

Fig 1

The Bloomberg building is behind those trees but you will need to climb a set of steps to access the entrance of the building. To find the Mueller Upper Deck parking lot, try to search “ROTC building, Johns Hopkins, Baltimore” in Google Map (Figure 2).

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That will take you to the road lead to the Mueller Parking lot.  Take the turnoff indicating “North Visitor Lot” and “ROTC building” from San Martin Drive (red star in figure 2) and follow that road, pass ROTC building on the left, you will reach the gate of Mueller Parking lot (Figure 3).

Fig 3

After parking your car, walk toward the building at the end of the Parking lot (Figure 4), follow the concrete path on your left, you will see a double glass door (Figure 5) that lead you inside the building.

Find the elevator to the fourth floor.  We will put up CMMS signs to direct you to the event.  When you arrive, please stop over at the registration table first to get your name tag and observatory tour assignment and be ready for a fun filled evening.

CMMS Members at M&M 2019, Portland

We hope everyone who attended M&M 2019 had a great time. Ru-Ching caught up with some local CMMS members enjoying the conference.

 

CMMS-UMB Joint Dinner, May 2019

Following the annual “Current EM Techniques Workshop” at UMB, CMMS hosted a joint dinner followed by 2 excellent talks given by Dr. Rhonda Stroud (US Naval Research Laboratory, MAS President) and Dr. Jiwen Zheng (FDA/Center for Devices and Radiological Health).

Dr. Rhonda Stroud described her research on the isotopic composition of interplanetary dust particles and micrometeorites and how it aids our understanding of the primitive astromaterials in the early solar system.

Dr. Jiwen Zheng described how electron microscopy research at FDA is used for testing generic drug products and for evaluating medical devices such as the coatings on guidewires surrogates.

CMMS Spring Meeting 2019

On Tuesday March 5th, members of the Chesapeake Microscopy & Microanalysis Society gathered at the Carnegie Institution of Science for the CMMS Spring Dinner. Catering was Mediterranean food provided by Mezze, and during dinner informal talks were given by each of the Board of Directors about their role gathered at the Carnegie Institution of Science for the CMMS Sprig Dinner. Following dinner, the group adjourned to the adjacent seminar room to listen to two talks. Catering was Mediterranean food provided by Mezze, and during dinner informal talks were given by each of the Board of Directors about their role in the Society. Following dinner, the group adjourned to the adjacent seminar room to listen to two talks.

The first talk was by Gary Bauchan from USDA ARS on the parasitic Varroa mites feeding on honey bees, and how cryo-SEM, TEM and Confocal techniques revealed that the mites feed on bee fat, not their blood as previously thought. He even brought along a 3D printed mite scaled up to human size, to give us an idea of what it would be like to be attacked by one ourselves!

The second talk was by Andrew Steele of the Carnegie Institution of Science, who told us about Martian meteorites, and how they can be used to help us search for life on Mars. While no life has yet been detected on the Red Planet, meteorite samples of the Martian surface can tell us about the presence of water and organic compounds that could have potentially formed the building blocks of life on Mars.

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CMMS Communications Officer, Joe Mowery, demonstrates the new CMMS website.

Fall Tour of the Billings Microscope Collection at NMHM

 

We had a great turnout for the CMMS tour of the Billing’s Microscope Collection at the National Museum of Health and Medicine on December 7, 2018. Part of the museum is open to the public and there were many interesting medical specimens and instruments on display.

 

CMMS was able to arrange a private behind the scenes tour of the more rare microscopes in the NMHM storage facilities. A few of the notable microscopes we observed include one of Roberts Hooke’s original microscopes, replicas of Leeuwenhoek microscopes, and a TEM captured during WWII, among many others. While we were not permitted to take pictures of the microscopes, they were certainly stunning to observe.

 

Following the 1.5 hr tour, we grouped back up at McGinty’s Pub in Silver Spring for appetizers and drinks, generously provided courtesy of ThermoFisher. A great time was had by all, and we look forward to organizing similar events in the future.

Sincerely,
Your CMMS Officers